Customers feedback

Comments: 6
  • #6

    Roel (Tuesday, 25 September 2018 00:58)

    I am the owner of a recording studio.
    The control room has acoustic treatment but due to the size of the room (quite small) the possibilities for treatment are limited.
    I was not satisfied about the sound in the studio especially about the sound of low frequency range.
    I have tried several room correction plug in software but i was not satisfied with the result, because they all sounded highly coloured and i stopped using them.
    So i had my doubts about digital room correction but i decided to try Homeaudiofidelity because i still wanted to improve the sound in my room.
    I was surprised at the filter set that Homeaudiofidelity delivered.
    The result is a better sounding room, a much more neutral sound with more detail in the lows and mixes that translate better on other systems.
    Highly recommended.

  • #5

    Luis Bameule (Friday, 26 January 2018 16:32)

    Thank you very much Thierry for your help and work. Many of us can understand what you do, but a different thing is actually doing it. You have made it easy for us to enjoy the improvements technology can bring to our systems so as to overcome the realities of our listening environments and their limitations. The change in my system was clear and important:

    * much better balance and taming of bass, it sounds a lot better, crispier, more real, while also putting the mids and highs in their place, for lack of a better expression.
    * huge improvement in soundstage and stereo field, even in a complex situation as my listenting space, with one whole side open while the other one is a wall.

    Thierry is also quick to answer, knowledgeable and nice, and very helpful. I cannot recommend this enough.

    Luis

  • #4

    Mark (Thursday, 05 October 2017 19:25)

    Thanks Thierry for doing this. I don't know what magic you are using, but my setup has never sounded this good. Just adding on to what Remi says in the below thread. I finally have a soundstage! The downside is I have to re-listen to all my music again :-). This has been the best purchase in awhile for me.

  • #3

    Rémi (Thursday, 07 September 2017 12:27)

    After a lot of playing around with tools such as REW, Rephase, Dirac, I was able to achieve an OK result in my untreated living room in terms of tone and balance. But I was somehow frustrated with the width and depth of the soundstage. I believed I had to go with it, blaming (rightfully) the many defects of my room - quite reverberant.

    Curious by nature and somehow skeptical in the first place, I tried Thierry's advanced filtering technique and... WOW ! Finally, I had the soundstage, super wide well beyond the walls, super defined. My speakers "vanished", it is no longer possible to locate them. Considering the price is 2-3 times cheaper than the competition, that you get a personalised service, an outstanding performance, I highly recommend you to try Home Audio Fidelity filters before any other paying convolution service, and definitely before buying any expensive cable or gimmick that will bring much less (or nothing) to your audiophile pleasure !

  • #2

    Rv_K (Friday, 01 September 2017 17:57)

    I tested and adopted the convolution filters made by Home Audio Fidelity as they represented a significant contribution to my audio configuration. My system is in a dedicated room processed acoustically. I listen mainly to dematerialized music. HAF filters have improved the impact of low frequencies and softened the top of the spectrum. In addition, the cross talk correction represents a major contribution to listening to acoustic music. Better separation, localisation.
    I tried homemade filters but they never reached the quality of those made by HAF.
    Knowing that the test is free, everyone can judge the contribution on his system. As said in the previous comment, the correction has a greater impact than the change of some cables.
    Just try it to have your own idea!

  • #1

    Paul K (Wednesday, 09 August 2017 05:34)

    I was particularly interested in the cross-talk reduction version of the filters. I’ve been a long-time user of REW and manually created and optimized convolution filters that have been in my system for a long time (way before I even had a PC-based system).

    Cross-Talk
    What is the cross-talk reduction and why is it important? Well, the theory is that recorded stereo sound when played back over stereo speakers causes mixing, or cross-talk, from left to right channel and from right to left. This is unnatural, since ideally anything recorded in the left channel should only reach the left ear, while anything recorded in the right channel should only reach the right ear.

    This clearly does not happen when playing music over speaker systems, since some of the sound from left speaker reaches the right ear, and some of the right channel sound reaches left ear. The theory goes that this produces a less natural sound, with less clarity and a more confused soundstage image. Note that this does not happen when listening to music over headphones! There are much more complex solutions that have been proposed to solve this problem, but most require a very tiny sweet spot, or involve complex head tracking algorithms that are as expensive as they are hard to implement.

    For this reason, when Thierry offered his service, I jumped on it. While his filters promise some cross-talk reduction, all of cross-talk cannot be completely eliminated with convolution filters.

    Conclusions
    Thierry was very helpful, patient, and provided great support during my trial. I can highly recommend that you try his service, especially the free evaluation he offers. I do suggest that you pick music that is very well recorded, with minimum amount of processing and good spatial cues, as that seems to highlight the effect of the cross-talk reducing filters the best.

    The filters worked in my system after a few false starts. The final version of XTALK reducing filters I settled on produced a more natural sound for voices, acoustic, and other well-recorded, minimally miked music. The result was a wider sound stage, and better focused, cleaner instruments and better sense of space. The sound extended further out and away from the speakers than with my regular filters. In fact I almost never heard the sound coming directly from my speakers with these filters.

    The effect was obvious but not overwhelming, I’d say about 15% improvement compared to what I’m used to with my system in the above areas. By way of comparison, I find that USB cables produce no difference in my system, a better DAC might produce a 10-20% improvement, digital and analog interconnects mostly have no effect. So, a 15% improvement is actually significant in relation to other things I could try to improve ;)

    Large scale, well-recorded choral performances did benefit quite a bit from these filters: individual voices became easier to distinguish and locate in a large group, where previously they sounded more like a large jumble of voices.

    Sounds of a large orchestra or synthesized or heavily produced rock recordings did not seem to benefit as much, but the filters never made things worse.

    The non-cross-talk reducing version of the filters turned out to be very similar to the filters I constructed myself, so there wasn’t much reason for me to use these. They might still be very helpful for those who don’t know how to create your own filters by measuring the room response and optimizing phase.

    Overall, I’m happy with Thierry’s cross-talk reducing filters, they’ll stay in my system, replacing my own. I recommend you try them yourself, but of course, YMMV!